Dentist - Eastpointe
18540 E. 9 Mile Rd.
Eastpointe, MI 48021
(586) 771-1460

Call Today (586) 771-1460

18540 E. 9 Mile Rd.
Eastpointe, MI 48021

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 Call Dr. Jost at 313-802-1460 if you are an established patient with an emergency. Thank you.

Dr. Jost has been my family's dentist for the past 25 years. His professionalism and care have been outstanding! I have sent many friends and family to him, and no one has been disappointed. He is gentle, kind, considerate and delivers excellent dental care. -  Bonnie
Clinton Twp, M

Most people say they HAVE to go to the dentist. My husband and I both LIKE to go! After 30 some years, we consider Dr. Jost and his staff part of our family. Whenever we have an "emergency," Dr. Jost makes time for us. To anyone looking for a dentist - give Dr. Jost a try. You won't be disappointed, and your smile will thank you.  Go Red Wings!
 

- Jeff & Debbie, Centerline, MI

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
November 27, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth pain  
TheKindofToothPainYouHaveMayIdentifytheTrueProblem

Pain can tell you things. Not verbally, of course, as in, “Hey, your appendix is inflamed!” But the quality of your pain—dull or sharp, constant or intermittent, acute or general—can point the way to the actual problem.

That's especially true of tooth pain, which could signal any number of dental problems. Looking at its characteristics, though, can narrow the search. Here are a few examples.

Sharp, momentary pain. This could be an indication of a number of possible dental problems. If it occurs for a few seconds after eating or drinking something hot or cold, it might signal a small area of tooth decay, a loose filling or early signs of gum recession. The latter could be a symptom of periodontal (gum) disease, so you should seek diagnosis and treatment as soon as possible.

Sharp pain when biting. Like tooth sensitivity, this could be a sign of decay or a loose filling, or it could indicate a fractured (cracked) tooth. If it's the latter, you may need an endodontist, a specialist in interior tooth problems, if you want the best chance for saving the tooth.

Dull ache in upper teeth. This might not be a dental problem at all, but radiating pain from an infection of the sinus just above the upper posterior teeth. The infection could also have begun with one of the molar teeth and advanced into the sinus. You'll need to see your dentist for any teeth or gums involved and possibly a physician to address any potential sinus infection.

Constant throbbing pain. That horrible toothache that won't stop could be the nerves in the tooth's interior under attack from decay. The primary means for saving a tooth with deep decay is a root canal treatment to clean out diseased tissue and replace it with a filling or a crown. You should see a dentist even if the pain suddenly subsides—this may only mean the nerves have died, but the infection is still active.

These are just a few of the problems, including true dental emergencies, that oral pain can signal. For any instance of pain in your mouth, see your dentist as soon as possible.

If you would like more information on tooth pain and what it might indicate, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Pain? Don't Wait!

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
November 25, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Family Dentistry  

Family dentistry provides comprehensive oral health care for patients of all ages. If you have a toddler, we are happy to perform her first dental exam. If your mom needs a root canal, we can help her, too. In Eastpointe, MI, Dr. Peter Jost is the family dentist to trust for all the preventive, restorative, and cosmetic services you and your loved ones need.

What we can serve you

Basically, your family dentist in Eastpointe, MI, joins with you and yours in keeping smiles healthy and attractive. At the heart of family dentistry is preventive care--routine cleanings, exams, X-rays, fluoride treatments, and more which maintain your well-being and oral function and avoid more complex care in the future. Dr. Peter Jost builds treatment plans to address immediate restorative needs, anticipates possible treatments, such as orthodontics, and sets the cosmetic goals which make healthy smiles sparkling and attractive.

It all happens here

Dr. Jost possesses such a wide skill set that he meets most dental care needs right at his Eastpointe or St. Clair Shores. From tooth-colored fillings to porcelain crowns to dental implant placement and restoration, he and his dependable team do it all. There's never a need to drive all over the area to get your care from one provider and your teen's care at another.

Plus, because we value enduring relationships, we will know your family through years of smile development and treatment planning. Dr. Jost even recognizes oral health trends that run in families. This knowledge is highly prized and can streamline your oral health care.

Our services

Among our customized treatments, we offer:

  • Complete exams, X-rays, and hygienic cleanings
  • Fluoride treatments
  • Plastic sealants
  • Tooth-colored fillings
  • Crowns
  • Bridges
  • Dentures
  • Dental implants
  • Bio-liner clear orthodontic aligners
  • Conventional orthodontia
  • Root canal therapy
  • Gum disease treatment
  • Porcelain veneers
  • Teeth whitening
  • Composite resin bonding
  • Emergency dental services
  • Sedation dentistry

Plus, you'll feel comfortable at our office. Our treatment rooms are bright and equipped with state of the art equipment. Our staff is friendly and respectful from the time you enter our doors to when you leave with your treatments completed.

Just like your primary care physician...

If you want the best of care for your loved ones, phone Dr. Peter Jost in Eastpointe or St. Clair Shores, MI. He'd be privileged to be your family dentist.

Call (586) 771-1460 for an appointment at either convenient location.

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
November 19, 2020
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: veneers  

Improve your smile appearance with porcelain veneers from Dr. Peter Jost. In his Eastpointe, MI, office, he'll show you how these thin laminates cover defects, reshape individual teeth and create tooth color which is both realistic and visually appealing. Learn more about this wonderful aesthetic service and decide if veneers are right for you.

What are veneers, and what can they fix?

Veneers, or dental laminates as they're also called, are super-thin pieces of high-quality ceramic. Custom-shaped to cover the front of flawed teeth, veneers disguise imperfections in size, shape, and structural integrity (due to congenital malformation or injury). Also, some dentists refer to veneers as instant orthodontics because they cover mild alignment issues such as narrow gaps, mild crowding, and more.

Getting veneers

Only your dentist can tell you if porcelain veneers are your best option. You'll come to Dr. Jost's Eastpointe, MI, office for an exam and review of your cosmetic goals. He can show you how your smile would look with veneers in place.

If you choose them, expect these steps in your treatment plan:

  1. Oral impressions
  2. Tooth resurfacing (removal of 1/2 millimeter of enamel to facilitate veneer fit)
  3. Placement of temporary veneers
  4. Fabrication of your veneers at a trusted dental lab
  5. Placement of your permanent veneers with a tooth-colored and permanent adhesive

Life with your new veneers

Most people adjust to the feel and bite of their new porcelain veneers quickly. Likely you will too.

Also, you can expect many years of sparkling smiles (10 years or more according to the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry). Veneers are highly durable when you take proper care of them. Actually, care is easy--another benefit of these realistic laminates.

Care includes:

  • Twice daily brushing with a soft toothbrush and low abrasion, fluoride toothpaste
  • Flossing once a day to remove plaque from veneer margins
  • Avoiding staining foods and beverages and all tobacco products
  • Gentle use (that means no biting fingernails or chewing ice cubes)

Interested in porcelain veneers?

Then, contact our Eastpointe or St. Clair Shores, MI, office for a consultation with Dr. Peter Jost. Your dentist works carefully with all his patients so they enjoy excellent oral health and smiles they can be proud of. Call us at (586) 771-1460.

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
November 17, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   smoking  
HeresWhySmokingCanBeHazardoustoYourDentalHealth

During his exploration of the Americas, Christopher Columbus encountered a native in a canoe loaded with water, food and a strange bunching of leaves. This marked the first European encounter with tobacco, a discovery that still haunts us to the present day. Today, millions smoke tobacco—and many suffer serious health problems as a result, including dental diseases like tooth decay and gum disease.

The American Cancer Society is sponsoring its 44th annual Great American Smokeout this November 19 when health providers across the country encourage smokers to kick the tobacco habit. Dentists will certainly be among them: Studies show that smokers are five times more likely to lose teeth than non-smokers due to a higher incidence of dental disease. Here's why.

Increased plaque and tartar. The main cause for tooth decay and gum disease is dental plaque, a thin, bacterial film that builds up on teeth. Brushing and flossing, along with regular dental cleanings, can keep plaque and its hardened form tartar from accumulating. But substances in tobacco restrict the flow of saliva needed to curb bacterial growth. This in turn can increase plaque accumulation and the risk for disease.

Hidden symptoms. Your gums often “tell” you when you have early gum disease by becoming swollen and red, and bleeding easily. But if you smoke, you might not get that early warning—the nicotine in tobacco interferes with your body's inflammatory response, so your gums, although infected, may look normal. By the time you find out, the infection may have already spread, increasing your chances of tooth loss.

Slow healing. Nicotine can also constrict the mouth's blood vessels, slowing the delivery of nutrients and infection-fighting antibodies to your teeth and gums. As a result, your body may have a harder time fighting tooth decay or gum disease, and diseased tissues can take longer to heal. Slower healing can also complicate the process of getting dental implants.

Increased oral cancer risk. Although it's not as prevalent as other cancers, oral cancer is still among the deadliest with a dismal 50% survival rate after five years. Smokers are six times more likely than non-smokers to develop oral cancer. But by quitting smoking and other forms of tobacco, you could reduce your oral cancer risk to that of a non-user in just a few years.

Kicking the smoking habit often takes a monumental effort, but it's worth it. Quitting not only improves your overall well-being, it could help you gain healthier teeth and gums. To learn how, see us for an up-to-date dental exam—we can show you how getting Columbus's most notorious discovery out of your life could do wonders for your smile and dental health.

If you would like more information about the effects of tobacco on your oral health, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Smoking and Gum Disease” and “Strategies to Stop Smoking.”

YouDontNeedtoPassaFootballLikePatrickMahomestoRemoveaLooseBabyTooth

Kids get pretty inventive pulling a loose primary (baby) tooth. After all, there's a profit motive involved (aka the Tooth Fairy). But a young Kansas City Chiefs fan may have topped his peers with his method, revealed in a recent Twitter video that went viral.

Inspired by all-star KC quarterback Patrick Mahomes (and sporting his #15 jersey), 7-year-old Jensen Palmer tied his loose tooth to a football with a line of string. Then, announcing “This is how an MVP gets their tooth out,” the next-gen QB sent the ball flying, with the tooth tailing close behind.

It appears young Palmer was no worse for wear with his tooth removal technique. But if you're thinking there might be a less risky, and less dramatic, way to remove a loose tooth, you're right. The first thing you should know, though: Primary teeth come out when they're good and ready, and that's important. Primary teeth play an important role in a child's current dental and speech function and their future dental development. For the latter, they serve as placeholders for permanent teeth developing within the gums. If one is lost prematurely, the corresponding permanent tooth might erupt out of position and cause bite problems.

In normal development, though, a primary tooth coming out coincides closely with the linked permanent tooth coming in. When it's time, the primary tooth lets you know by becoming quite loose in the socket.

If you think one of your children's primary teeth is ready, clean your hands first with soap and water. Then using a clean tissue, you should be able to easily wiggle the tooth with little tension. Grasp the tooth with the tissue and give it a little horizontal twist to pop it out. If that doesn't work, wait a day or two before trying again. If it does come out, be sure you have some clean gauze handy in case of bleeding from the empty socket.

Normally, nature takes its course from this point. But be on the lookout for abnormal signs like fragments of the tooth left behind in the socket (not to be mistaken for the top of the permanent tooth coming in). You should also look for redness, swelling or complaints of pain the following day—signs of possible infection. If you see anything like this, make a prompt appointment so we can take a look. Losing a primary tooth is a signpost pointing the way from childhood to adulthood (not to mention a windfall for kids under their pillows). You can help make it a smooth transition—no forward pass required.

If you would like more information about caring for primary teeth, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Importance of Baby Teeth” and “Losing a Baby Tooth.”





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Dr. Jost

Peter Jost, DDS, PC

Dr. Jost is a 1981 graduate of the University of Michigan School of Dentistry where he received first- rate training in all aspects of general dentistry.  In 1983

Read more about Peter Jost, DDS, PC

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