Dentist - Eastpointe
18540 E. 9 Mile Rd.
Eastpointe, MI 48021
(586) 771-1460

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18540 E. 9 Mile Rd.
Eastpointe, MI 48021

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Dr. Jost has been my family's dentist for the past 25 years. His professionalism and care have been outstanding! I have sent many friends and family to him and no one has been disappointed. He is gentle, kind, considerate and delivers excellent dental care.

-  Bonnie
Clinton Twp, MI


 
Most people say they HAVE to go to the dentist. My husband and I both LIKE to go! After 30 some years, we consider Dr. Jost and his staff part of our family. Whenever we have an "emergency" Dr. Jost makes time for us. To anyone looking for a dentist - give Dr. Jost a try. You won't be disappointed and your smile will thank you.  Go Red Wings!
 

- Jeff & Debbie, Centerline, MI

Posts for category: Dental Procedures

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
June 06, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
ADifferentKindofChipShotforProGolferDanielleKang

While the sport of golf may not look too dangerous from the sidelines, players know it can sometimes lead to mishaps. There are accidents involving golf carts and clubs, painful muscle and back injuries, and even the threat of lightning strikes on the greens. Yet it wasn’t any of these things that caused professional golfer Danielle Kang’s broken tooth on the opening day of the LPGA Singapore tournament.

“I was eating and it broke,” explained Kang. “My dentist told me, I've chipped another one before, and he said, you don't break it at that moment. It's been broken and it just chips off.” Fortunately, the winner of the 2017 Women’s PGA championship got immediate dental treatment, and went right back on the course to play a solid round, shooting 68.

Kang’s unlucky “chip shot” is far from a rare occurrence. In fact, chipped, fractured and broken teeth are among the most common dental injuries. The cause can be crunching too hard on a piece of ice or hard candy, a sudden accident or a blow to the face, or a tooth that’s weakened by decay or repetitive stress from a habit like nail biting. Feeling a broken tooth in your mouth can cause surprise and worry—but luckily, dentists have many ways of restoring the tooth’s appearance and function.

Exactly how a broken tooth is treated depends on how much of its structure is missing, and whether the soft tissue deep inside of it has been compromised. When a fracture exposes the tooth’s soft pulp it can easily become infected, which may lead to serious problems. In this situation, a root canal or extraction will likely be needed. This involves carefully removing the infected pulp tissue and disinfecting and sealing the “canals” (hollow spaces inside the tooth) to prevent further infection. The tooth can then be restored, often with a crown (cap) to replace the entire visible part. A timely root canal procedure can often save a tooth that would otherwise need to be extracted (removed).

For less serious chips, dental veneers may be an option. Made of durable and lifelike porcelain, veneers are translucent shells that go over the front surfaces of teeth. They can cover minor to moderate chips and cracks, and even correct size and spacing irregularities and discoloration. Veneers can be custom-made in a dental laboratory from a model of your teeth, and are cemented to teeth for a long-lasting and natural-looking restoration.

Minor chips can often be remedied via dental bonding. Here, layers of tooth-colored resin are applied to the surfaces being restored. The resin is shaped to fill in the missing structure and hardened by a special light. While not as long-lasting as other restoration methods, bonding is a relatively simple and inexpensive technique that can often be completed in just one office visit.

If you have questions about restoring chipped teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Veneers” and “Artistic Repair of Chipped Teeth With Composite Resin.”

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
May 27, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implant   bone loss  
AnImplantRestorationCouldPreventBoneLoss

Losing teeth continues to be an all too common experience for people, especially those in their senior years. Fortunately, there are several ways to replace them, ranging from partial or full dentures to implants.

Some, though, postpone or simply choose not to replace a lost tooth, often because of the cost. But putting off a dental restoration could have a long-term impact on your health, and not in a good way. Continuing bone deterioration is one of the top consequences of delayed restoration.

Like other bones in the body, the jawbone is living tissue with cells that form, grow and eventually wear out. At the end of their life, these older cells give way to new cells. Eating and chewing play an important role in maintaining this growth cycle: the forces we generate as we chew travel up through the tooth roots to stimulate bone growth in the jaw.

When a tooth goes missing, though, the stimulus ends. Over time the bone cell replacement rate can fall off and the bone slowly loses volume. To make matters worse, bone loss can continue beyond the immediate bone underlying the tooth and affect the rest of the jawbone. The jaw can shrink in height and width, and in time become weaker overall and more susceptible to fracture.

But dental implant restorations in particular could help stop or even reverse bone deterioration at the site of the missing teeth. The titanium post implanted in the jaw attracts bone cells, which grow and adhere to its surface. Over time the bone fills in and becomes stronger.

You don't want to wait too long, though, because implants depend on a minimum amount of bone present for secure placement. You should therefore undergo an implant restoration as soon as it's practical after tooth loss. Otherwise, although we may be able to restore some of the lost bone with bone grafting, you may need to consider another restorative option.

When it comes to replacing missing teeth, time isn't on your side. But the right kind of dental restoration undertaken promptly can make for a brighter, healthier future.

If you would like more information on restoring lost teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth.”

WhyAlfonsoRibeiroIsGratefulforRootCanalTreatment

As the host of America's Funniest Home Videos on ABC TV, Alfonso Ribeiro has witnessed plenty of unintentional physical comedy…or, as he puts it in an interview with Dear Doctor–Dentistry & Oral Health magazine, "When people do stuff and you're like, 'Dude, you just hurt yourself for no reason!'" So when he had his own dental dilemma, Alfonso was determined not to let it turn onto an "epic fail."

The television personality was in his thirties when a painful tooth infection flared up. Instead of ignoring the problem, he took care of it by visiting his dentist, who recommended a root canal procedure. "It's not like you wake up and go, 'Yay, I'm going to have my root canal today!'" he joked. "But once it's done, you couldn't be happier because the pain is gone and you're just smiling because you're no longer in pain!"

Alfonso's experience echoes that of many other people. The root canal procedure is designed to save an infected tooth that otherwise would probably be lost. The infection may start when harmful bacteria from the mouth create a small hole (called a cavity) in the tooth's surface. If left untreated, the decay bacteria continue to eat away at the tooth's structure. Eventually, they can reach the soft pulp tissue, which extends through branching spaces deep inside the tooth called root canals.

Once infection gets a foothold there, it's time for root canal treatment! In this procedure, the area is first numbed; next, a small hole is made in the tooth to give access to the pulp, which contains nerves and blood vessels. The diseased tissue is then carefully removed with tiny instruments, and the canals are disinfected to prevent bacteria from spreading. Finally, the tooth is sealed up to prevent re-infection. Following treatment, a crown (cap) is usually required to restore the tooth's full function and appearance.

Root canal treatment sometimes gets a bad rap from people who are unfamiliar with it, or have come across misinformation on the internet. The truth is, a root canal doesn't cause pain: It relieves pain! The alternatives—having the tooth pulled or leaving the infection untreated—are often much worse.

Having a tooth extracted and replaced can be costly and time consuming…yet a missing tooth that isn't replaced can cause problems for your oral health, nutrition and self-esteem. And an untreated infection doesn't just go away on its own—it continues to smolder in your body, potentially causing serious problems. So if you need a root canal, don't delay!

If you would like additional information on root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “A Step-By-Step Guide to Root Canal Treatment” and “Root Canal Treatment: What You Need to Know.”

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
April 24, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  

The words "root canal" often have a less than favorable connotation to some people. However, the truth is that this procedure not only Root_Canalpreserves your oral health but it also actually relieves pain! Read on to your Eastpointe dentist, Dr. Peter Jost, uses this treatment to help save his patients' smiles!

 

Who needs a root canal?

Named for the tiny, slender chambers which course down each tooth root, root canal therapy heals infection and reinforces weak tooth structure. Before recommending this restorative procedure, your Eastpointe, dentist will perform a careful examination of the suspect tooth. X-rays reveal the health and position of tooth roots—important information that determines whether a root canal can actually relieve pain and prevent unnecessary extraction.

The American Association of Endodontists says that root canal therapy takes up to three dental visits. Once the treatment is complete, the tooth will quickly normalize and should last for many years—possibly even for the rest of the patient's life!

The signs which indicate you need a root canal are:

  • Toothache pain
  • Drainage
  • Bad breath
  • A noticeable crack in tooth enamel or roots (as seen on X-ray)
  • Dental sensitivity to sugar, cold or heat
  • A sore or pimple on the gums
  • Enamel discoloration
  • Weak tooth structure due to decay or multiple fillings

 

The procedure

Treatment is actually quite simple! It begins with your dentist numbing the area around the tooth before using specialized tools to remove any infected pulp and smooth the interior walls of the canals. Medication is then administered to quell infection and inflammation, while a putty called gutta-percha is used to seal and strengthen the canals. Dr. Jost repeats these steps on all canals and before placing a temporary cap over the tooth. Healing at home takes about a week.

When you return to Dr. Jost's office, he'll remove the temporary restoration and then bond a new porcelain crown in place. This crown is customized for color, size, and shape and blends in with the surrounding teeth.

 

Life with your restored tooth

Your tooth will feel comfortable and look natural. You can depend on its strength and durability, but we do caution that good at-home care and regular in-office check-ups are critical to long-term health and tooth retention.

 

Find out more

Count on Dr. Peter Jost and his team to make you comfortable and give life back to your damaged tooth. Root canal treatment really is nothing to fear! Call the office today to set-up your procedure: (586) 771-1460.

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
February 28, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental crowns  

To keep yourself protected from the cold, you put on a sweatshirt or coat. This same concept is applied to dental crowns, which protect crown fragile or damaged teeth from further problems. Dr. Peter Jost, your family dentist in Eastpointe, Michigan, routinely uses crowns for his patients who need them to keep their smile functional and looking great. Read on to learn more!

What are dental crowns?

A crown is essentially an artificial tooth that is hollow in the middle. It fits over and is adhered to the top of a tooth that has sustained damage from trauma or decay above the surface of the gums. Crowns keep the roots of the teeth intact while protecting the top of the weakened tooth, an action that allows you to retain normal oral functionality.

Modern crowns have been in use since the early 1900s, when an American dentist first patented a porcelain crown that looked very much like the ones your Eastpointe family dentist still uses today! However, archaeological digs in the Philippines have also uncovered gold coverings designed to fix and replace damaged or missing teeth from some 4,000 years ago! Today, crowns can be made from porcelain, resin, or metals such as silver and gold.

How can a crown help me?

Years of dental industry research have shown that maintaining permanent teeth as long as possible is one of the keys to good overall dental health. However, accidents happen and many people experience a lapse in regular checkups with their dentists at some point in their lives. This may lead to breakage or cavities that are too large to be repaired with a standard filling. In these instances, a crown can be used to make sure that a damaged permanent tooth is as close to restored as possible. This keeps the roots of the tooth stable and allows you to chew comfortably and smile confidently. Crowns are also used to stabilize bridges, which fill in gaps caused by missing teeth.

If you have decay or a damaged tooth and are ready to look and feel better with dental crowns, contact the family dentistry practice of Peter Jost in Eastpointe, Michigan, for an appointment today! Our number is (586) 771-1460.



Dr. Jost

Peter Jost, DDS, PC

Dr. Jost is a 1981 graduate of the University of Michigan School of Dentistry where he received first- rate training in all aspects of general dentistry.  In 1983

Read more about Peter Jost, DDS, PC

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