Dentist - Eastpointe
18540 E. 9 Mile Rd.
Eastpointe, MI 48021
(586) 771-1460

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18540 E. 9 Mile Rd.
Eastpointe, MI 48021

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We are having great difficulty with Comcast. If you have tried to call our office and have not been able to get through it is because Comcast will not address and fix the technical difficulties we are experiencing since May. Call Dr. Jost at 313-802-1460 if you need to reach us to schedule an appointment. Thank you.

Dr. Jost has been my family's dentist for the past 25 years. His professionalism and care have been outstanding! I have sent many friends and family to him, and no one has been disappointed. He is gentle, kind, considerate and delivers excellent dental care. -  Bonnie
Clinton Twp, M

Most people say they HAVE to go to the dentist. My husband and I both LIKE to go! After 30 some years, we consider Dr. Jost and his staff part of our family. Whenever we have an "emergency," Dr. Jost makes time for us. To anyone looking for a dentist - give Dr. Jost a try. You won't be disappointed, and your smile will thank you.  Go Red Wings!
 

- Jeff & Debbie, Centerline, MI

Posts for category: Dental Procedures

YouCanHaveaStraighterSmile-JustLiketheQueenofEngland

The monarchs of the world experience the same health issues as their subjects—but they often tend to be hush-hush about it. Recently, though, the normally reticent Queen Elizabeth II let some young dental patients in on a lesser known fact about Her Majesty's teeth.

While touring a new dental hospital, the queen told some children being fitted for braces that she too “had wires” once upon a time. She also said, “I think it's worth it in the end.”

The queen isn't the only member of the House of Windsor to need help with a poor bite. Both Princes William and Harry have worn braces, as have other members of the royal family. A propensity for overbites, underbites and other malocclusions (poor bites) can indeed pass down through families, whether of noble or common lineage.

Fortunately, there are many ways to correct congenital malocclusions, depending on their type and severity. Here are 3 of them.

Braces and clear aligners. Braces are the tried and true way to straighten misaligned teeth, while the clear aligner method—removable plastic mouth trays—is the relative “new kid on the block.” Braces are indeed effective for a wide range of malocclusions, but their wires and brackets make it difficult to brush and floss, and they're not particularly attractive. Clear aligners solve both of these issues, though they may not handle more complex malocclusions as well as braces.

Palatal expanders. When the upper jaw develops too narrowly, a malocclusion may result from teeth crowding into too small a space. But before the upper jaw bones fuse together in late childhood, orthodontists can fit a device called a palatal expander inside the upper teeth, which exerts gentle outward pressure on the teeth. This encourages more bone growth in the center to widen the jaw and help prevent a difficult malocclusion from forming.

Specialized braces for impacted teeth. An impacted tooth, which remains partially or completely hidden in the gums, can impede dental health, function and appearance. But we may be able to coax some impacted teeth like the front canines into full eruption. This requires a special orthodontic technique in which a bracket is surgically attached to the impacted tooth's crown. A chain connected to the bracket is then looped over other orthodontic hardware to gradually pull the tooth down where it should be.

Although some techniques like palatal expanders are best undertaken in early dental development, people of any age and reasonably good health can have a problem bite corrected with other methods. If you are among those who benefit from orthodontics, you'll have something in common with the Sovereign of the British Isles: a healthy, attractive and straighter smile.

If you would like more information about orthodontic treatment options, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Magic of Orthodontics.”

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
June 22, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures

Dental crowns are great long-term teeth restorations because they’re capable of correcting an array of teeth issues. Here at Peter Jost, DDS, PC in Eastpointe, MI, your dentist, Dr. Peter Jost, regularly utilizes dental crowns for restoring damaged teeth. But how exactly do crowns restore a damaged tooth?

Restoring Decayed Teeth

Decay is an issue that can impact anyone. It results in various issues including discoloration, extreme sensitivity, and severe pain. Dental crowns aid in strengthening your tooth, improving your smile, and safeguarding your tooth against further decay and sensitivity.

Replacing Worn-Out and Unsightly Dental Fillings

You have a dental filling if you’ve sustained a cavity that was treated by your Dentist Eastpointe, MI. Although dental fillings are very effective, they eventually break down and require replacements. When this happens, you leave your tooth vulnerable to decay once again. If you have replaced a dental filling multiple times, it might be time to consider a more long-lasting and durable treatment such as a dental crown.

Repairing Broken Teeth

Between overly hard foods, accidents, and sports, plenty of people have lost a portion of their tooth. Fortunately, you do not need to live with an incomplete tooth. Your Dentist Eastpointe, MI can easily reshape the affected tooth’s leftover structure and then fit a dental crown over it, making your tooth whole again. As a bonus, your tooth will look like the rest of your teeth.

Replacing Missing Teeth

The same factors that can chip your teeth could also lead to getting a tooth knocked out. Also, improper oral care habits can result in your teeth falling out. Thankfully, you won’t have to suffer the effects of lost teeth by opting for a dental crown combined with an implant or bridge.

Whitening Stained or Discolored Teeth

Not all people have teeth with uniform shades. Some people have that lone discolored tooth due to trauma, untreated decay, or medications. Regardless of the specific reason, a crown can easily correct a stained tooth to ensure that it perfectly matches the shade of your remaining natural teeth.

Interested in What Dental Crowns Can Do For You? Give Us a Call

Book a consultation with your dentist, Dr. Peter Jost, here at Peter Jost, DDS, PC in Eastpointe, MI, by calling (586) 771-1460.

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
May 31, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
CrazyLittleThingCalledHyperdontia

The movie Bohemian Rhapsody celebrates the iconic rock band Queen and its legendary lead vocalist, Freddie Mercury. But when we see pictures of the flamboyant singer, many fans both old and new may wonder—what made Freddie’s toothy smile look the way it did? Here’s the answer: The singer was born with four extra teeth at the back of his mouth, which caused his front teeth to be pushed forward, giving him a noticeable overbite.

The presence of extra teeth—more than 20 primary (baby) teeth or 32 adult teeth—is a relatively rare condition called hyperdontia. Sometimes this condition causes no trouble, and an extra tooth (or two) isn’t even recognized until the person has an oral examination. In other situations, hyperdontia can create problems in the mouth such as crowding, malocclusion (bad bite) and periodontal disease. That’s when treatment may be recommended.

Exactly what kind of treatment is needed? There’s a different answer for each individual, but in many cases the problem can be successfully resolved with tooth extraction (removal) and orthodontic treatment (such as braces).┬áSome people may be concerned about having teeth removed, whether it’s for this problem or another issue. But in skilled hands, this procedure is routine and relatively painless.

Teeth aren’t set rigidly in the jawbone like posts in cement—they are actually held in place dynamically by a fibrous membrane called the periodontal ligament. With careful manipulation of the tooth, these fibers can be dislodged and the tooth can be easily extracted. Of course, you won’t feel this happening because extraction is done under anesthesia (often via a numbing shot). In addition, you may be given a sedative or anti-anxiety medication to help you relax during the procedure.

After extraction, some bone grafting material may be placed in the tooth socket and gauze may be applied to control bleeding; sutures (stitches) are sometimes used as well. You’ll receive instructions on medication and post-extraction care before you go home. While you will probably feel discomfort in the area right after the procedure, in a week or so the healing process will be well underway.

Sometimes, dental problems like hyperdontia need immediate treatment because they can negatively affect your overall health; at other times, the issue may be mainly cosmetic. Freddie Mercury declined treatment because he was afraid dental work might interfere with his vocal range. But the decision to change the way your smile looks is up to you; after an examination, we can help you determine what treatment options are appropriate for your own situation.

If you have questions about tooth extraction or orthodontics, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Simple Tooth Extraction” and “The Magic of Orthodontics.”

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
May 11, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: porcelain veneers  
Ultra-ThinVeneersMightHelpYouAvoidEnamelRemoval

Dental veneers—thin, life-like layers of porcelain bonded to teeth—can turn a so-so smile into a beautiful one. But most veneers have a distinct drawback: To make them look as natural as possible, the teeth they're bonded with must have some of their surface enamel removed.

Even though they're 1 millimeter or less in thickness, veneers on an unprepared tooth can look bulky. Removing some of the surface enamel remedies this, but doing so permanently alters the tooth. The tooth will need a veneer or some other protective restoration from then on.

Now, though, there's an alternative veneer available for many dental patients. Known as No-Prep or Minimal-Prep, these new veneers are often as thin as a contact lens.

These new types of veneers can often be placed directly on the teeth just above the gum line without any enamel removal and look natural. At the most, the enamel beneath them may need reshaping with an abrasive tool. And, unlike traditional veneers with tooth alteration, these low-prep veneers can often be applied without anesthesia, and in as few as two appointments.

No- or Minimal-Preps are better suited for certain kinds of patients: those with small teeth or teeth that appear small due to larger mouth features; worn teeth from aging or teeth grinding or with small gaps; narrow smiles where the side teeth aren't as visible; and teeth that are slightly misshapen or with minor staining.

On the other hand, patients with oversized teeth or front teeth that jut forward may still encounter problems with an unnatural, bulky appearance even with ultra-thin veneers. The latter situation can often be corrected with orthodontic treatment first to realign the teeth to their proper positions. Once the bite is corrected, no-prep veneers may then become a viable option.

If you'd like to consider these minimal preparation veneers, see your dentist for an examination. The exam results will help determine what type of veneer solution is right for you. And whether you go with traditional or No-Prep veneers, the change in your smile can be amazing.

If you would like more information on porcelain veneers without enamel removal, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “No-Prep Porcelain Veneers.”

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
May 07, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Root Canal Therapy  

Find out why your dentist may recommend getting root canal treatment.

It isn’t always easy to tell whether or not you need a root canal, just as it isn’t always easy to tell that you need a dental filling. Luckily, our Eastpointe, MI, dentist Dr. Peter Jost is able to spot these problems right away during routine checkups to make sure that you get the immediate care you need.

Why is a root canal necessary?

A root canal is a commonly performed endodontic procedure that is designed to fix and save natural teeth that are damaged, infected or severely decayed. Under the enamel and dentin layers of a tooth lie the pulp and root canals.

The pulp is made up of nerves and blood vessels, and when bacteria or an injury damage the pulp it causes an infection or inflammation. Once this happens, the only way to repair the tooth is for our Eastpointe, MI, family dentist to remove the dental pulp.

You may need a root canal if,

  • You have severe decay and a dental filling can’t fully support what’s left of the tooth
  • You have a dental infection
  • You have a chipped or cracked tooth
  • You experienced a traumatic blow or injury to a tooth

What are the warning signs?

When your tooth is in distress, often times you will know it. Once decay or an injury has left the dental pulp infected or damaged the most common signs include,

  • A severe, persistent toothache that may get worse when biting or chewing
  • Sudden lingering sensitivity to hot or cold
  • A dark or discolored tooth (a sign that the tissue inside the tooth is dying)
  • Swollen, inflamed gums around the affected tooth
  • An abscess (a bump on the gums that resembles a pimple)

If you suspect that you might have an inflamed or infected dental pulp, don’t panic. A root canal can often solve the problem. It’s just important that you seek immediate dental care when you need it. A root canal is a minimally invasive and painless procedure that will save your natural tooth.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, our Eastpointe, MI, family dentist and his team will only be providing dental care to patients dealing with urgent matters. If you are dealing with a toothache or other warning signs that you may need a root canal, please call us at (586) 771-1460. In the meantime, stay healthy and safe and we hope to see everyone again soon.



Dr. Jost

Peter Jost, DDS, PC

Dr. Jost is a 1981 graduate of the University of Michigan School of Dentistry where he received first- rate training in all aspects of general dentistry.  In 1983

Read more about Peter Jost, DDS, PC

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