Dentist - Eastpointe
18540 E. 9 Mile Rd.
Eastpointe, MI 48021
(586) 771-1460

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18540 E. 9 Mile Rd.
Eastpointe, MI 48021

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We are having great difficulty with Comcast. If you have tried to call our office and have not been able to get through it is because Comcast will not address and fix the technical difficulties we are experiencing since May. Call Dr. Jost at 313-802-1460 if you need to reach us to schedule an appointment. Thank you.

Dr. Jost has been my family's dentist for the past 25 years. His professionalism and care have been outstanding! I have sent many friends and family to him, and no one has been disappointed. He is gentle, kind, considerate and delivers excellent dental care. -  Bonnie
Clinton Twp, M

Most people say they HAVE to go to the dentist. My husband and I both LIKE to go! After 30 some years, we consider Dr. Jost and his staff part of our family. Whenever we have an "emergency," Dr. Jost makes time for us. To anyone looking for a dentist - give Dr. Jost a try. You won't be disappointed, and your smile will thank you.  Go Red Wings!
 

- Jeff & Debbie, Centerline, MI

Posts for tag: toothache

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
November 23, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth pain   toothache  
3TypesofToothPainandWhatTheyMightbeTellingYou

Physical pain is never pleasant or welcomed. Nevertheless, it’s necessary for your well-being—pain is your body telling you something isn’t right and needs your attention.

That fully applies to tooth pain. Not all tooth pain is the same—the intensity, location and duration could all be telling you one of a number of things that could be wrong. In a way, pain has its own “language” that can give us vital clues as to what’s truly causing it.

Here are 3 types of tooth pain and what they might be telling you about an underlying dental problem.

Sensitivity to hot or cold. If you’ve ever had a sharp, momentary pain after consuming something hot like coffee or cold like ice cream, this could indicate several causative possibilities. You might have a small area of tooth decay or a loose filling. You might also have an exposed root due to gum recession, which is much more sensitive to temperature or pressure changes. The latter is also a sign of periodontal (gum) disease.

Acute or constant pain. If you’re feeling a severe and continuing pain from one particular area of your teeth (even if you can’t tell exactly which one), this could mean the pulp, the tooth’s innermost layer, has become infected with decay. The pain is emanating from nerves within the pulp coming under attack from the decay. To save the tooth, you may need a root canal treatment to remove the decayed tissue and seal the tooth from further infection. You should see your dentist as soon as possible, even if the pain suddenly stops—that only means the nerves have died, but the decay is still there and threatening your tooth.

┬áSevere gum pain. If there’s an extremely painful spot on your gums especially sensitive to touch, then you may have an abscess. This is a localized area of infection that develops in the gums either as the result of periodontal (gum) disease, or an infection spreading from the tooth pulp into the gum tissues. You’ll need to see a dentist immediately for both pain relief and appropriate treatment (including a possible root canal) to heal the abscessed tissue.

If you would like more information on tooth pain and how to treat it, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Pain? Don’t Wait!

By Peter Jost, D.D.S., P.C.
April 30, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth pain   toothache  
DontLetToothPainLingermdashTheCostMayJustBeTooHigh

Tooth pain occurs when a trauma or infection triggers a reaction from the nerves inside a tooth's pulp chamber. The severity of the pain and its duration can vary depending on the underlying cause, which can include anything from a loose filling to an abscess. Ignoring symptoms not only results in unnecessary physical and emotional pain, but can also lead to more expensive dental treatment as problems become more complex. Make an appointment with our office today if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms:

  • Sharp pain when biting down on food — This type of pain could be indicative of a cracked tooth, loose filling, or tooth decay that is affecting one or more of your teeth. We can remove decay and replace a loose filling, but if your tooth is cracked, we will have to determine the location and depth of the crack before formulating a treatment plan. In some cases, root canal treatment or even extraction may be necessary.
  • Pain that lingers after eating hot or cold foods or liquids — Mild and short-term sensitivity (lasting only seconds or a minute) to hot and cold foods resulting from gum recession can often be soothed by using a fluoride toothpaste made for sensitive teeth. However, an inflamed tooth pulp or one that is dying due to severe decay could cause sensitivity that lingers for a long time after exposure. In this case, root canal treatment may be necessary to remove dying pulp tissue in order to save the tooth.
  • Constant severe pain and pressure, swelling of the gums, and sensitivity to touch — Infections and/or abscesses can spread from the tooth pulp into the surrounding periodontal tissues and bone causing this type of pain. Root canal treatment will most likely be required.
  • Dull ache and pressure on one or both sides of the face in the upper teeth region — The sinuses and upper back teeth share the same nerves, so, oftentimes, referred pain from sinus congestion or infection can feel like a toothache. A thorough examination can determine whether or not the pain is dentally related.

If you are experiencing tooth pain, call our office immediately so that we can begin to provide you with some relief. To read about other symptoms of tooth pain and possible treatment options, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Pain? Don't Wait!



Dr. Jost

Peter Jost, DDS, PC

Dr. Jost is a 1981 graduate of the University of Michigan School of Dentistry where he received first- rate training in all aspects of general dentistry.  In 1983

Read more about Peter Jost, DDS, PC

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